In Bulgaria, an exit poll indicated that the centre-right GERB party of former Prime Minister Boyko Borissov would likely win the parliamentary vote. The reformist, pro-Western continues to Change the party of former Prime Minister Kiril Petkov
In Bulgaria, an exit poll indicated that the centre-right GERB party of former Prime Minister Boyko Borissov would likely win the parliamentary vote. The reformist, pro-Western continues to Change the party of former Prime Minister Kiril Petkov

In Bulgaria, an exit poll indicated that the centre-right GERB party of former Prime Minister Boyko Borissov would likely win the parliamentary vote. The reformist, pro-Western continues to Change the party of former Prime Minister Kiril Petkov as it appeared to lose ground to GERB in the Gallup International exit poll conducted on Sunday, which showed GERB achieving 24.6 % support.

Before the final, the official results will be made public, which can take days. Borissov will be given the green light to assemble his fourth administration after confirming the exit poll. It will be difficult for him to form a stable government coalition, though, as the majority of political parties have already said they will not work with his party to run Bulgaria.

Bulgaria, the poorest member of the EU, is struggling with around 20% annual inflation. The difference compared to the last year is difficult to believe. Due to the present situation, Bulgarian citizens are too worried about the upcoming winter. Due to severe disagreements among the political elite on managing systemic corruption, which was the subject of the previous election in November, the Balkan country has struggled to maintain stable leadership.

According to opinion polls, up to eight political groups could enter the next parliament. If a working cabinet could not be formed, President Rumen Radev would appoint a caretaker government to govern the NATO and EU member. Analysts claim that political parties may put their differences aside and choose a technocrat government in light of the economic concerns posed by the Ukraine conflict, the approaching winter, and people’s impatience with political instability.

Since the last election in November, support for established parties has remained primarily unchanged, including that of Petkov’s partners, the Socialists and anti-graft Democratic Bulgaria, and the MRF party, which represents ethnic Turks.

The 240 members of the parliament were up for election from among around 6.6 million eligible voters. By 5 o’clock, there had been a lower voter turnout than in prior elections, nearly 30%. Analysts attributed that to voter drowsiness and disenchantment with politicians who couldn’t create a workable government alliance.