Low-income countries' health sector should be strengthened to avoid future health crisis: Dr Tedros
Low-income countries' health sector should be strengthened to avoid future health crisis: Dr Tedros

The Director-General of the World Health Organisation (WHO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, stated that bolstering the health sectors of low-income countries is the way to avoid a future health crisis.

While sharing their views on the issue, Dr Tedros tweeted, “I agree that there is a need to protect the world from future health crises. This includes supporting a stronger WHO and boosting health systems in low-income countries. As you say, there is no sense in being selfish when it comes to public health”.

Dr Tedros Adhanom Gebreyesus, the Director-General of the World Health Organization, visited the WHO Country Office during his visit to Azerbaijan, where he met with the staff of the Country Office and heard their suggestions.

In terms of the COVID-19 vaccination, till June 18, there are a total of 5,220,920,779 individuals across the world who have taken their at least the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and are now in the category of partially vaccinated. This number of individuals represents around 66.9% of the total targeted eligible population of the world, as per the official data.

On the other hand, there are a total of 4,775,274,537 individuals who have received their required recommended number of COVID-19 vaccines approved by the World Health Organisation and are now fully vaccinated against the contagious viral illness. This number of individuals represents nearly 61.2% of the total targeted eligible population living across the globe, the data further adds.

The international organisation has also asked the general public to follow the COVID-19 norms so as to prevent contracting the mutant while also appealing to the population to get vaccinated against the virus. For more than two years, millions of people lost their lives to the deadliest mutant.

WHO further provided a reminder to the world, noting that the “COVID pandemic is not over yet”.