Former Prime minister of Bulgaria Boyko Borissov has sealed their win in the fourth elections conducted in two years since 2021 after Kiril Petkov's government collapsed in June due to no vote of confidence. His party came second, obtaining 20% of the votes
Former Prime minister of Bulgaria Boyko Borissov has sealed their win in the fourth elections conducted in two years since 2021 after Kiril Petkov's government collapsed in June due to no vote of confidence. His party came second, obtaining 20% of the votes

Former Prime minister of Bulgaria Boyko Borissov has sealed their win in the fourth elections conducted in two years since 2021 after Kiril Petkov’s government collapsed in June due to no vote of confidence. His party came second, obtaining 20% of the votes. Borissov’s GERB party is set to form a majority by gaining 24.6% support.

Borissov lacks four seats after winning Bulgaria elections 2022 to form a majority even after joining forces with DPS and BV. That is why he wants a grand coalition in which PP and DB share governance of the country during a hard upcoming winter.

But the path to forming a majority is not clear for Borissov due to his political exile, and no Bulgarian political party wants to form an alliance with his party. Bulgaria’s ability to deal with record inflation, a plan to embrace the euro, and the effects of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could lead to possible fifth elections.

After casting his vote on Sunday in Sofia, Radev told reporters that creating a government is getting more challenging. The nation requires strong and legitimate institutions to withstand crises, carry out significant changes, and make long-term strategic decisions.

An interim cabinet chosen by President Rumen Radev, a retired military who has deflected charges of softening the nation’s posture toward Moscow, has filled the vacancy thus far. While Radev’s interim administration moved to reopen negotiations with Russian state-owned Gazprom PJSC to resume supplies, Petkov tried to compel a hard turn away from Russia.

The head of state criticised the EU sanctions after the Kremlin seized Crimea in 2014, which he hinted at one point belonged to Russia. In a speech last week, he denounced President Vladimir Putin’s aggression, but he also cautioned that the EU should reduce the dangers associated with its sanctions on the Kremlin.

Bulgaria is facing the worst crisis since the Russian oil firm Gazprom cut its supplies to Bulgaria. The country, with a population of 6.5 million individuals, suffers from sudden inflation in gas prices.